Surprise Aurora Show

On the night of May 27/28 observers got to see a rare display of northern lights.

May 27/28 aurora

Photo by Ray Wiens, at Elk Island, near Edmonton, Alberta.

Given the recent decline in solar activity and the increasingly short nights, the widely observed (and photographed) aurora this past weekend was a pleasant surprise.

Here is a selection of photographs submitted by SkyNews readers:

This composite photo by SkyNews contributing photographer Malcolm Park shows three passes made by the International Space Station during the auroral display.

This composite photo by SkyNews contributing photographer Malcolm Park shows three passes of the International Space Station during the auroral display.

May 27/28 aurora

Warren Finlay photographed the display from Jasper National Park, Alberta.

May 27/28 aurora

Photo by Bill McMullen at Cumberland, Ontario.

May 27/28 aurora

Photo by Bill McMullen at Cumberland, Ontario.

May 27/28 aurora

Photo by Dale Armstrong at Fingal, Ontario.

May 27/28 aurora

SkyNews editor Gary Seronik recorded this image from, Penticton British Columbia.

May 27/28 aurora

Rick Stankiewicz captured this view of the aurora with the International Space Station (the linear streak near image centre) from a site near Peterborough, Ontario.

May 27/28 aurora

Photo by Brian Thomas, taken at a latitude of 42 degrees north, near Merlin, Ontario.

May 27/28 aurora

Photo by Krista Trinder from Grasslands National Park, Saskatchewan.

May 27/28 aurora

James Barron photographed the aurora from Edmonton, Alberta.

May 27/28 aurora

Dave McKenzie captured the aurora shimmering over the Prince George Centre Observatory in Prince George, British Columbia.

Be sure to visit our Aurora Watch page to keep tabs on current activity.

Categories: Aurora
6 comments on “Surprise Aurora Show
  1. Very nice show of pictures. It must have been a wonderful spectacle in the skies.

  2. Susan says:

    We saw the aurora in East Kootney. It was very widespread. Sadly, our view was pale white, not the beautiful show of colour in these photos. Was this just our bad luck or does the camera see colour we cannot?

    • Gary says:

      The camera does show colours too faint for our eyes to perceive at low illumination levels.

    • Brian Allan says:

      Auroras range from white through green to red to blue to magenta, etc. A night vision adapted human eye can see at least the green portion; however, ten second shots with a camera will see far more of Aurora.

      The May 27th Aurora was spectacular as seen in my web album above!

      bwa

  3. Janice Jones says:

    Those are amazing sights!! Beautiful!!!!

  4. Cecilia Ratko says:

    Awesome n Spectacular shots of the Aurora Borrealis.

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